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Autumn 2019   

Thursday 5th September - Red Joan (12A)

Thursday 3rd October - Collette (15)

FRIDAY 1st November - Rocketman (15)

Thursday 5th December - Fisherman’s Friends (12A)

 

Tickets at Daisy B's available from the Monday after the previous show

News and Reviews

Monday
Jul152019

The Keeper (15)  

The Keeper tells the extraordinary true love story between a young English woman and a German PoW, who together overcome prejudice, public hostility and personal tragedy. While visiting a PoW camp near Manchester at the end of the 2nd WW, Margaret Friar, the daughter of the manager of the local football team notices a young German soldier Bert Trautmann. Her father is so taken by Bert's prowess as a goal-keeper that he gets him out of the camp to play for his local team - Margaret's and Bert's love blossoms despite local hostility and resentment of the German PoWs. In the meantime Bert's heroics in goal are noticed by Man City and rather than going back to Germany like many of the other inmates, Bert marries Margaret and signs for Man City. His signing causes outrage to thousands of Man City fans, many of them Jewish. But Margaret wins support from an unexpected direction: Rabbi Altmann and Bert's path to acceptance begins, peaking at the 1956 FA Cup Final.

"The motif of duty and the lost innocence of war is revisited throughout. The dramatic performances in the movie are strong throughout. David Kross is excellent as the troubled Bert Trautmann but he was also superb in The Reader 10 years ago. One of the many things which struck me whilst watching from a modern standpoint is the parallel with the returning IS soldiers and how the loud echoes of intolerance seem equally prescient now as they did when Trautmann’s signing for City was met with loud protests. There are clear lessons in the past which are both uplifting and inspiring." David Cook (Fan Sided)

 

Running time 120mins 

 

 

Saturday
Jun152019

Mary Queen of Scots (15)

 

‘Mary Queen of Scots’ explores the turbulent life of the charismatic Mary Stuart. Queen of France at 16 and widowed at 18, Mary defies pressure to remarry. Instead, she returns to her native Scotland to reclaim her rightful throne. But Scotland and England fall under the rule of the compelling Elizabeth I. Each young Queen beholds her "sister" in fear and fascination. Rivals in power and in love, and female regents in a masculine world, the two must decide how to play the game of marriage versus independence. Determined to rule as much more than a figurehead, Mary asserts her claim to the English throne, threatening Elizabeth's sovereignty. Betrayal, rebellion, and conspiracies within each court imperil both thrones - and change the course of history.

History has not been kind to Mary, Queen of Scots. Beyond her native land, she’s little more than a tragic footnote in Tudor history, ruined by disastrous marriages and the suspicion of her subjects. She fled into the arms of her cousin, Elizabeth I of England, only to find herself imprisoned and (eventually) on the chopping block. However, Mary Queen of Scots, a new film on her life, promises to reposition the reputations of Mary and Elizabeth, not as victim and destroyer, but as formidable equals, played, in turn, by two formidable actors, Saoirse Ronan and Margot Robbie. Clarisse Loughrey for The Independent

 

Running time 120mins 

 

Saturday
May112019

A Private War (15)  

 

 

In a world where journalism is under attack, Marie Colvin (Rosamund Pike) is one of the most celebrated war correspondents of our time. Colvin is an utterly fearless and rebellious spirit, driven to the frontlines of conflicts across the globe to give voice to the voiceless, while constantly testing the limits between bravery and bravado. After being hit by a grenade in Sri Lanka, she wears a distinctive eye patch and is still as comfortable sipping martinis with London's elite as she is confronting dictators. Colvin sacrifices loving relationships, and over time, her personal life starts to unravel as the trauma she's witnessed takes its toll. Yet, her mission to show the true cost of war leads her, along with renowned war photographer Paul Conroy (Jamie Dornan) -- to embark on the most dangerous assignment of their lives in the besieged Syrian city of Homs.

Written by Aviron Pictures

"This heartfelt work, based on a Vanity Fair article by Marie Brenner entitled Marie Colvin’s Private War covers Colvin’s troubled, passionate career up to Homs, where her reporting disproved Assad’s lies about not targeting civilians. Rosamund Pike does an honest job playing Colvin and Jamie Dornan is her photographer, Paul Conroy". 

  Peter Bradshaw for The Guardian

 

Running time 110mins 

Sunday
Apr072019

First Man (12A)  

 

This riveting story directed by Damien Chazelle (Whiplash, La La Land) tells of the first manned mission to the moon, focusing on Neil Armstrong (Ryan Gosling) and the decade leading up to the historic Apollo 11 flight. 

A visceral and intimate account told from Armstrong’s perspective, the film explores the triumphs and the cost on Armstrong, his family, his colleagues and the nation itself, of one of the most dangerous missions in history.  Armstrong’s wife is played by Claire Foy of ‘The Crown’ and ‘Wolf Hall’ fame.

“While Gosling plays everything close to his chest, it’s Foy who invites us into the unfolding drama with her wonderfully empathetic performance”. (Mark Kermode for The Observer)

 

Running Time 2hr 21mins

 

 

Saturday
Mar092019

The Wife (15)

 

After nearly forty years of marriage, Joan and Joe Castleman (Glenn Close and Jonathan Pryce) are complements. Joe enjoys his very public role as a great American novelist, Joan pours her considerable intellect, grace, charm, and diplomacy into the private role of Great Man's Wife.

“Close is absolutely mesmerising as the woman who gives every appearance of standing faithfully by her man, yet with myriad subtle looks and glances suggests a lifetime of simmering discontent.”  Radio Times

 “This is an unmissable movie for Glen Close fans. Actually, you can’t watch it without becoming a fan – if you weren’t one already” (Peter Bradshaw for The Guardian)

Running Time 1hr 40mins